Bipolar disorder and highly sensitive people

Peacock by Rachel Miller

Written by Rachel Miller
Original artwork by Rachel Miller

Early Experiences

I’ve always felt like an outsider, so different to everybody else, like I had been dropped off on the wrong planet. Everyone around me, even at primary school, seemed so settled in the world, like living on Earth was the easiest and most natural thing. I felt alien.

I was prone to becoming overwhelmed by school, particularly being in large groups or in noisy environments. I was really sensitive to comments by other kids and how they perceived me and would get upset very easily. Anxiety was my constant companion throughout my school days and later became apparent in the workplace too.

My first depressive episode came at university and was probably the most scary time of my life. I had absolutely no idea what the hell was wrong with me! Why couldn’t I get out of bed, or even leave my room? Why would I lock the door, shut all the curtains and pray nobody came to find me? I would freeze with fear if anyone came to knock on the door. I would sleep all day and think about death.

Bipolar was diagnosed when I was interviewed by a psychiatrist, who determined that I had also experienced hypomanic symptoms before. This was all news to me as I thought I just had a particularly energetic, upbeat personality and was prone to hardcore PMS!

What is Bipolar Disorder?

In the simplest and most basic of terms, Bipolar Disorder is a mood disorder characterised by episodes of depression (often severe) and mania or hypomania: a highly disruptive state of increased energy leading to erratic behaviour and in severe cases, delusions and other forms of psychosis.

What does it mean to be a Highly Sensitive Person (HSP)?

The term Highly Sensitive Person or HSP was first popularised by the author Elaine Aron in her book: The Highly Sensitive Person. She found that 15-20% of the population could be classified as HSPs through the following commonalities:

  • Being easily overwhelmed by environmental factors such as strong smells, harsh/artificial lighting, loud noise eg. sirens.
  • Getting rattled by having too much to do in too short a time.
  • Being upset by violence in the media and animal cruelty.
  • Needing to withdraw into peace and quiet when overwhelmed.
  • Have a rich and complex inner life.
  • Enjoy delicate or fine scents, taste, sounds or works of art.
  • Often seen by parents or teachers as shy or sensitive.

To find out if you are an HSP, take the quiz here.

Common HSP careers include: artist, writer, musician, therapist, counsellor, teacher, complementary therapist, yoga teacher, psychologist, designer.

Being an HSP in a Highly Stimulating Society.

Western society today worships success; success defined by status, money, power, what car you drive, the clothes you wear, how big and grand your house is.

Achieving career and societal status often involves a busy, hectic lifestyle, something which can easily overwhelm an HSP. City-living may also play a part: loud noises, car fumes, crowds of people- the majority of the population can deal with this fairly easily, but this is an HSP’s nightmare.

There are many stressors out there to overwhelm our system.

How is Bipolar Disorder linked to being an HSP?

Being an HSP is innate- it is a trait we are born with. The degree to which we are affected by a loud noise will be inherent in our biological make up. It therefore makes sense that HSPs will be more affected by various environmental factors that are experienced when growing up. Our nervous systems will be easily over-stimulated and over-worked, therefore making us more vulnerable to conditions such as anxiety and depression, or any genetic conditions inherent within our families.

In my case I believe I was much more affected by harsh treatment and comments than the average child. I also experienced life in a dysfunctional family and teasing/being picked on at school.

Bipolar Disorder is also present in our family history.

The HSP Manic Connection.

Being easily overstimulated can also come about from more “pleasant” means. I can easily feel “on a high” after attending a classical music concert or ballet, too much high-intensity exercise, or when writing flows easily. This high is perhaps more easily attained as an HSP.

For me, the high comes with inspiration, a wealth of ideas and deeper spiritual experiences. It is wonderful to indulge these ideas creatively which can keep the high going. We might also seek out more inspirational experiences: more concerts, more parties, more movies, more shopping.

More, more, more may end up completely overwhelming us until we become irritable, restless, agitated and then eventually crash, exhausted into depression. Here lies the Bipolar Cycle.

However I would like to stress that not all HSPs are Bipolar and not all Bipolar sufferers are HSPs.

If the traits inherent in an HSP child are adapted to and nurtured healthily, an HSP may thrive. They have been taught that their sensitivity is a gift to be cherished- which it most certainly is!

The Gift of High Sensitivity

High sensitivity must first and foremost be seen as a gift.

Often HSPs experience the world in delicate subtleties of texture, form, colour and emotion. We may be able to express ourselves creatively with beautiful results: art, music, theatrical performances, writing.

We are often empathic people, capable of helping others with problems in their lives. We can be invaluable as friends.

We may be capable of experiencing greater meaning in our lives in terms of spirituality.

Red Kite by Rachel Miller

Bipolar, HSPs and Empaths

Some of us may come to view our sensitivity from a more spiritual perspective.

I have found more acceptance and “family” in the spiritual community where I have begun to find psychic gifts in my sensitivity that I never knew existed. There are also others like me!

Some HSPs may also be Empaths.

Empaths, without training, may soak up the emotions of everybody around them! Think of the chaos experienced- one minute feeling fine, the next depressed, the next angry, the next elated. No wonder we need so much time alone! No wonder a diagnosis of Bipolar.

Happily, there are methods to protect ourselves which can easily be learned. I’m currently in the process of developing these skills with the help of a wonderful teacher.

Again- not all HSPs or Bipolar sufferers are Empaths, but there is the possibility and if I can point this out to even one person who thinks “wow, that’s me”, then I’ll be very happy.

Changing Our Perspective

Once we can see our sensitivity as a gift, we are in a position to quit fighting it and trying to fit in with society!  It is OK for us to be different.

We are showing others that there is another way to live life. [Tweet this quote!]

We don’t have to be running around like headless chickens all the time!

I’m learning that:

  • It’s OK that I need more time alone, I don’t have to be a social butterfly.
  • It’s OK to be different and like different things. If I want to listen to classical music and it makes me happy, that is what is most important.
  • I can stop trying to look after everyone else. I’m no good to anyone if I don’t look after my health and wellness first!
  • It’s OK to be good at something. Other people feel threatened when you are good at something. I still feel ashamed of showing any giftedness. This is one I still need a lot of work on. I was taught that it’s better to be invisible.
  • It’s OK to withdraw from negative people, including family and toxic friends.

Goldfinch by Rachel Miller

Learning to Look After Ourselves.

I’m learning to look after myself by:

  • meditating and journalling every day.
  • walking in nature everyday.
  • doing yoga.
  • expressing myself through my blog.
  • limiting my time in the city and crowded, noisy environments.
  • distracting myself when I start ruminating negatively and worrying.
  • asking for help when I need it!!! (Always a tough one for me!)

The best advice I could offer to anyone just diagnosed with Bipolar is to form a good relationship with your doctor which means being honest with them, listening to them, be open to receiving help and trying their suggestions, always sticking to your medication regime, but also remembering that they don’t know what it’s like to be you and sometimes they wont always be right!

As you make your way through the Bipolar journey you naturally work out what works for you and what doesn’t.

If you think you might be an HSP, it can be helpful to do a bit of research (see links below), indulge in your gifts and find like-minded people who can help you to love yourself!

Great Bipolar Disorder Websites:

McMan’s Depression and Bipolar Web
BP Hope

Video blog- High Sensitivity vs Bipolar on Sensitive and Thriving by past Superhero guest blogger Ane Axford.

Great Sensitivity Websites:

Highly Sensitive Survivors
HSP Health

­For the Open-Minded:

Traits of An Empath
Are You An Emotional Empath?- Judith Orlaff MD
Psychic But Sane- Signs That You’re An Empath

 

Artwork credit: Rachel Miller

 

Rachel Miller is the blog author of My Bipolar Life.  She writes informative and personal posts that combine her experiences with bipolar, high sensitivity, holistic healing modalities, and life, and her love for research and sharing.


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Comments

  • Ady mills

    A great article written by a great author. A shame there’s not more pieces written on bipolar issues like this.

    • Rachel Miller

      You little star Ady! Thanks for the comment and for checking out the article. Hope you are well xx

      • Gypsymichele

        Wow Rachel I have been following you on Pinterest for a long time now. My ex-husband is bipolar.. I have never known what was wrong with me but I knew from a young age I was different and had issues and gifts. I had a life of never needing anything I was given the world yet a mother that beat me and all kinds of horrible things, so I just chalked up my issues with her doing what she did to me (long story). I have many gifts that I am so blessed to have, since the age of 4. I am an Empath, Clairvoyance, Clairaudience, Clairsentience, Claircognizance, Psychometry.. Everyday one of my gifts are stronger than the others, it just depends on the days.. ♥ I’m glad to figure out what may be my issue.. Thank you, Gypsymichele

        • Rachel Miller

          Hi Gypsymichele- I recognize your name from Pinterest, I think I am also following some of your boards. I love Pinterest, it’s ace!

          Thanks so much for reading my post on Trish’s fab website. I am so glad to have found another kindred spirit! I always felt so different too- I lived in my own little world! I’m really sad to hear what your childhood was like. I hope things are much better now.

          I think I identify most with being an empath- my clairsentience seems stronger than the others. Clairaudience & claircognizance are getting better though!

          Really lovely to hear from you.

          Rachel
          xxx

  • Shauna Smith

    Love this article.. I have recently found that I too have some gifts that may very well explain a lot in my life.. I started to research and learn but life has gotten in the way.. I am not far from being able to get back into it and your post here makes me want to start now.. I was told by a friend I was clairsentient, which from what I have learned is really related to being an empath. Feeling what others feel learning by studying someone who is doing something and feeling how it feels to do that and then being able to do it with no real lessons. I learned to drive this way!

    Anyway, Thank you for the article.

    Shauna

    • Rachel Miller

      Thanks Shauna- glad you could relate!

      Clarsentience is exactly the tool of empaths! We so easily pick up everyone elses’ “stuff” that we end up carrying their problems with us and don’t realise why we feel so depressed!

      Thank you for your comment and I’m glad you liked the article xx

      • Shauna Smith

        hey I just read this again and I am now on the look for someone to help me with this Empath gift and the sensitivities that come with it.. Again I just wanted to say thanks for posting this.. It is exactly highlighting my life. :) I am hoping to learn more and get it under control.

  • Madison

    Wow, great article and tipsI have a lot identification with it. I can also appreciate the thoroughness on how you explained bioolar and HSP.

    Thank you,
    Madison

    • Rachel Miller

      Thank you Madison! So glad you felt you could identify with the article and I hope you can take something positive away with you.

      Rachel
      xx

  • nb

    Thanks for all the information on both bipolar and HSP. Your view on both was
    very interesting.

    • Rachel Miller

      Thank you very much, I’m glad you found the article interesting.

      Rachel

  • Bethany Lee

    Rachel is an extremely talented and sensitive writer. I have followed her blog for many months now and always enjoy her writing. I had never heard of this extremely sensitive trait and so I took the test when I recognized myself in it. Certainly, not surprisingly, I found that I checked off many of the questions. Thanks once again for providing high quality writing on Mental Health Talks. :-)

    • Rachel Miller

      Thanks Bethany Lee, your comments are very kind and greatly appreciated. Glad you got something positive out of the article.

      Rachel
      xx

  • matthew Jantomaso

    This is a great article. I had never heard of HSP before, but I think it is a perfect label for those fortunate enough to be in-tune with the sensations of the mind/matter phenomena. I say fortunate, as they are certainly 2 steps ahead in finding the ability to experience true peace…true happiness. For, the way I see it, the way I have experienced it, is that it is this sensitivity that enables one to observe the truth in this thing we call reality…and lends to the opportunity to transform the way we engage…or interact with it. Personally, i had to reach..for lack of better words…bottom…before taking the steps to using this gift to transform the path in which i followed. I was in the depths of severe mental illness..and had completely lost control…to the point of taking my own life…but it was at that point that i had a conscious moment…a spark of light…that allowed me to take the first…tiny step toward the realization that this misery was not of the world, not of the things around me….but within me…and that i had an opportunity to a make a change…for if there were not that opportunity…i would not be writing this to you today! Much peace to you and much happiness

    • Rachel Miller

      Thank you so much for this great response. It sounds like you’ve been through some really tough times yourself! It’s so wonderful that you’ve been able to go inwards to find your peace too. I think letting go of our ego to do this can often be difficult. We don’t want to believe that we are responsible for our experiences and how we perceive them. It is so much easier to blame somebody else or the world in general- which I still do quite a lot, may I add! I’m learning, al little bit at a time!

      Thanks for visiting my blog as well, I will definitely be over to check out your site too as I’m sure you can teach me a lot!!

  • Lar

    Awesome article. My my children and myself, all have this sensitivity. This is very helpful advice, just need to find our stable ground etc. Bipolar is such a threatening label especially with all the big pharma stuff going on. I prefer homeopathic and flower essence remedies to cope, no chemical drugs. We vibrate at a different speed than the rest of the world, it definitely is exhausting and I think we tend to forget we need to take special care of ourselves. I felt like I was the one who wrote this article, that just goes to show how much of a parallel there is in the whole experience, I believe we have the empathic trait and absorb everything, that is rough too. Diet helps but still have a long way to go to feeling balanced. Thank you so much for writing this.

    • Rachel Miller

      Thanks so much Lar- sorry this reply is so late- I didn’t realise I was still getting comments!!
      It’s good to know there are others out there- it can be quite an isolating experience being an HSP. I think we need some kind of teaching as a child to cope with it all. Thanks so much for reading and commenting, I really appreciate it. Rachel

  • Dianne

    Rachel, your description sounds like it could have been written by me. Nice to now I’m not the only one who has felt this way. I never felt like I fit in, and even as an adult I really struggle in the working world, with all the demands. I get overwhelmed so easily, and everything I feel is so intense. I was diagnosed as Manic Depressive as a young adult, though I never had the true “manic” episodes, but because I had recurring, deep depressions. When I read about HSP it really struck a nerve. Recently I have been going through a number of huge life changes that have been almost unbearably overwhelming, along with mood swings, and I was wondering if HSP was actually BP. Thank you so much for sharing your article!

  • Rick

    Mental anguish or Chaos is nothing but dissonance of many truth (and lies) coalescing toward unity such as is with Nature spiral down like the Fibonacci from infinity gradually and sequentially into 8, 5, 3, 2, 1, 1, 0. Basically when there are many different opinions, the energy itself is also diffused across so many entities or neurons and therefore no-one being able to assert power over the rest. However as the dances between truth and and false draws out toward infinity only the higher truths and the bigger lies will survive. Right before the very end you will have the Highest Truth and the Biggest Lie going head to head. For most people these two are symmetrical – look identical (the study of dialectics)- Truth and Lies are almost indistinguishable.

    Bipolar will reign (Fib 8, 5, 3, “2″) for months maybe even years. Eventually for most people, one side of the brain will overpower the other thus people either sway to the lies or see the truth. Then they will stand up for one cause or the other thus War (mental conflict) is eventually unavoidable! This is all part of the spiritual process or growth however you like to call it; still Zero in Fibonacci of the brain would be either a brain stroke or a heart attack.

  • Stephen

    Thank you so much for this. I was finally definitively diagnosed with Bipolar 2 Rapid Cycling just last Friday. I’m 39 years old and, apparently, I’ve had this order for at least 1/2 my life, if not longer. What you described is so close to who I am, I cried while reading. Looks like a found a solid psychiatrist, and I’m hopeful for the future.

  • Rachel Miller

    Hi Stephen,

    Thank you so much for your positivity, I’m really glad you connected with the article.

    Diagnosis can be difficult to deal with. But the disorder itself is one massive challenge. There are many of us sensitive souls out there, it’s just finding those who are similar and being around them. I’ve found a lovely group who are like me and it really helps me accept my sensitivity.

    I would guess that you are a highly creative/intelligent type and it is important to protect your sensitivity in order to utilize these gifts to the full. It’s ok to be different!! In fact once you accept the gifts you’ve been given and learn to love yourself, it can even be something you’ll cherish.

    I’m glad you found a good psychiatrist and that you are hopeful for the future. I wish you the best of luck. Be strong.

    Thanks again,

    Rachel

  • Leigh

    Insightful articles. Upon reading them I feel less defective. I even understand my condition more. I experience all three conditions (BP, HSP & Emp). I would like to learn more about using these traits as strengths in all areas of my life. Funny, just last week as I sat in quiet time I thought about how I could research ways to use my BP traits as strengths.

    Thanks for such insight.

    • Rachel Miller

      Hi Leigh,

      Thanks so much for reading- I’m really glad the article helped you to feel less defective. You have such a great attitude- to find ways to use your BP traits as strengths. I think the BP is just one side to having a highly intelligent, highly creative & intuitive mindset: it’s just that the BP causes so much damage when it first manifests. We need to take care of our sensitivities & nurture our talents!!

      Thanks for your positive feedback!

      Rachel

  • Linda Graziano

    Hi Rachel,
    Thanks so much for such a great post! I relate to it all! I have bipolar disorder, am an HSP, and an Empath! One of the most important things that helps me most is to tune into who I am and really love who I am….. Self-love is a very important way to sustain my wellness. Day-to-day things I do are to periodically take slow, deep breaths to calm me, journaling about my thoughts and feelings, listen to my intuition, and to give myself nurturing and love when I am feeling down and fearful. I am a life coach and I help other women with bipolar disorder to learn these tools. Please feel free to check out my website!
    It is so nice to connect with someone who has so much in common with me! :)
    Linda

    • Rachel Miller

      Hi Linda,

      Thanks so much for taking the time to comment- we do have lots in common! I’m so glad you enjoyed the post. I use very similar ways to manage my sensitivity too: little “breathing” breaks/grounding, journalling, as well as quite a bit of meditation. I agree that self-love is the key and really nurturing ourselves. How wonderful to be a life coach and be able to give back to people with similar challenges.

      Thanks again- it’s great to connect with you.

      Rachel

  • Paula M

    Hi Rachel,
    Thank you! I really needed to read this today, I have no one that understands the many aspects of my disorder. Yes, I’m highly sensitive, have extreme Bi-Polar 1 and I’m an Empath. I FEEL EVERYTHING and sometimes it overwhelms me extremely. I’ve had to abruptly walk away from many toxic relationships purely for survival reasons and I too have accepted that it is OK; nobody else understands that. I take the prescribed medication for the mania because I can be quite unpleasant otherwise, I do this to protect everyone I love and it keeps everyone, including myself a little happier. I miss the energy and i am just getting re-acquainted with my creativity again, its still there but it took me a while to find it under the umbrella of psychiatric drugs. I agree with staying honest and working with the doctors to better maintain the Bi-Polar but nothing seems to stop the many sensitivities I have. Yes, they are a gift, most definitely! I feel what others feel and always take it on, I have helped many people because of it but sometimes i can’t always handle it. I have to go to a quite place with my little dog and just breath through it and let her love me unconditionally. I too am learning to take time alone to regroup, it has become one of the most effective tools in my personal management program. I was feeling very alone and misunderstood today, your words are the first I’ve read that I can truly relate to. I’m feeling a bit more at ease just knowing that I’m not the only one out there going through all of this, I’d never put all three together before now. I just want to say Thank you for bridging all three, most people just think I’m just crazy but I’m gifted, it makes me different and different is misunderstood!
    Paula

  • Rachel Miller

    Hi Paula,

    I’m so happy that you felt a little less alone after reading the article and can truly relate. When I wrote this I told myself that if even one person can relate and gain something from the link between high sensitivity, bipolar and empathic ability then that is an achievement in itself!

    I love being with my dog too- they’re wonderful healers!

    I wish you luck on your journey with health, creativity, love & happiness!

    Thanks so much for sharing here.

    Rachel

  • Steven

    Rachel, I must thank you for your wonderful presentation of your web content, I am really glad to find so much information that is extremely good, useful and I do not find elsewhere. As a BP, at times I feel that life is very complex and painful due the difficulty in maintaining relationship with family, friends and society as a whole, especially with the changing economical situation. Perhaps the best way to live is to understand that changing cycles of mood swings. Your blog clearly helps me in finding many who have similar traits as mine, and certainly it’s like finding a shoulder to lean upon. Thank you for your wonderful work.

    • Rachel Miller

      Hi Steven,

      Thank you so much for your very kind comments- I am so glad I could help you in some way.

      Yes, life with these frequent mood changes does make life very complex. I see it as a major journey of looking at how I can be the best me I can be, but also manage to keep myself as balanced as possible. I’ve finally learnt that I was never meant to be like everyone else LOL!

      I wish you luck on your bipolar journey and with your relationships.

      Rachel

  • Jill

    Hi Rachel,
    Your mental state sounds a lot like mine and when i started reading I couldn’t help but cry to know that other people know what I am going through. I have always been scared of just life in general…I am either pissed at the world for all the corruption and unnecessary hurt that is happening to every living thing on this earth. Or I would be so happy with my life and living that I would draw and paint(or hike) for days to express the happiness I felt(usually drawing loved ones or nature). I have dreams that are very vivid and recently I had a dream which my grandfather came and sat next to me and told me “there’s not much time lest, please hurry yourself” and I knew what he was talking about. I can’t just hide away in my room waiting for a prince to save me like I have read in all my fantasy romance books…I need to find my path…well I told him “I know” and cried into his shoulder and then awoke with the feeling of him around me. Then I told my sister and she showed me your website. My sister knows just what I am. I am going to be having back surgery in less then a week, my first surgery. I have a severely herniated disk and I have had it for 7 months….7 months of intense pain did something to my nerves…it seems like now I am always sad, and always lost….Once this surgery is done and I can get out of pain I hope I can find my path like the many people with our gifts have done. Thank you for putting things into place for me at such a dire time in my life.

    • Rachel Miller

      Hi Jill,

      Thanks so much for your comments- I’m so glad that my post resonated with you and helped you to feel- even a little bit- less alone and more connected. We certainly have a challenging life path!

      I very much hope that your surgery goes well and that you can immerse yourself in your gifts!

      Rachel

  • Liza

    There are many factors that determine how being highly sensitive affects a person. If the person has been a childhood victim of emotional and/or physical abuse, that make any relationship much more difficult. That person may be consumed by feelings of inadequacy, guilt and shame, and be critical of others as well as suspicious of everyone’s motives. They may be unable to accept suggestions and unable to completely trust others–even their romantic partners. Best advice–avoid such a relationship.

    • Tina

      I just found this article. All my life I have felt this way. Myself, along with my sister and brother are all gifted. I write, sing, and do pen and ink. These feelings are most severe in me, but my sis is an empath. I need help. I’m 50 now and on disability for bipolar. I have achieved little in life, yet have so many gifts. I get confused and angry. My father was always quite angry and was prone to emotional outbursts. I grew up dreading his loud voice. I try so very hard. I am in a choir, but sometimes I feel lost and want to quite. To hide. My blinds are closed. My heart is closed. I don’t want to be like this. My doctor doesn’t listen. I hate meds cause they make me feel dead inside. I have been on so many. I exercise a lot to keep symptoms of too much energy at bay.

  • Mark

    I have bipolar with HSP, as I found that fit perfectly after reading this article. When I am in this HSP Manic state, I am so intune that I can tap into the afterlife. I have had many visions that seemed very surreal to me. I do have a very deep spiritual connection. I have seen many of these spiritual gifts manifested to me while in this state. For example; I am listening to Mozart… suddenly, I could feel energy coming out of the tips of my fingers and could see and separate ever instrument in composition. I was writing, collaborating with on feature film screenwriting projects that came very natural to me. The one thing I regret is that this all lead to a psychotic break. I remember saying to my wife… after going on my meds, I don’t feel happy anymore, or have the desire to be creative anymore. Where is the silver-lining?

  • Me

    Hi,

    I just want to say that everything you have highlighted rings true. I get worried or shy to be overly confident, I rush my speech and get overly excited a lot… I learnt a technique, breathing technique which seems to be working… I feel others pain and it worries me when I am alone… Everyones pain. I hate hearing about the negativity in the world or listening to discriminatory opinions of others.. I remember every word that someone says around me.. I can’t help it. When I invest my time in someone, I really do it 100%… It gets so much though, that I have to run and hide. It is overpowering when the person latches onto me.

    I hate racism. I hate bullying. I hate corruption altogether. I hate the news and media. I am so sensitive to everything people say or do. I forgive people I love very easily because I hate the feeling of resentment or anger. Life is too short.

    I always felt like an outsider too… Like I don’t belong here… I actually remember quite vividly one day, walking to school.. Another argumentative morning erupting in my dysfunctional household… Times where tough back then.. I was bullied terribly in school, broken home, sexually assaulted, suicidal (in and our of hospital a lot), drugs, drinking etc etc… I remember one particular chilly morning, walking slowly, I had this realisation that I was alone.. It was like my whole world had suddenly changed around me and I could feel the drop in frequency… That particular morning, a little man called me over and gave me a small gold cross. I didn’t think much of it until me and my Mum found him dead the next week. It is a peculiar turn of events.

    I look at some people who really don’t care about anything, who literally only see what is in front of them and I am still undecided whether or not I would prefer to be one of them. Mindless, carefree etc… But to me that kind of individual has to be selfish for them to not consider others opinions/feelings…. Or maybe it is just the fact that we care too much?

    How are you all with “routine”?? Because I am very inconsistent in all my patterns.. Eating, drinking, sleeping… Everything!!!

    Thank you again :) <3 <3 Much love fellow HSP's :) M3

    • Rachel Miller

      Thanks so much for sharing this. You sound very much like me! As far as routine goes, yes, I am very inconsistent too. But I think routine is very good for me (judging by past experience- I just don’t seem to get into one!! My sleep is a bit more consistent than it used to be though.

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